The production and transportation of hydrocarbon products involves complex process systems with components that are exposed to extreme operational and environmental conditions. To ensure safe and continuous operation, it is important to identify probable risk sources and assess the integrity of the pipeline to avoid accidental or catastrophic failures.

It’s becoming more common for pipelines ─ even cathodically protected ones ─ to experience external corrosion due to induced alternating current. This induced AC corrosion can be difficult to detect, let alone control, without an understanding of what it is and how it occurs. This article covers the fundamental concepts behind this unique type of corrosion, along with strategies for controlling it and protecting pipeline personnel from AC-related safety hazards.

Key Facts About Induced AC Corrosion

In the current phase of the pipeline safety enhancement plan (PSEP), SoCalGas and San Diego Gas & Electric will test and replace about 1,000 miles of pipe throughout the system.

While much of the construction work takes place in fairly remote locations, a significant portion is found in busy populated areas. Whether the work is in cities or unincorporated counties, in urban or rural space, customers and the local community are affected. Long before we received approval for PSEP, we knew community and customer outreach would be a critical factor for success.

Pipelines are a valuable asset and need protection. In order to achieve this, a modern pipeline integrity management program usually includes regular inspections followed by integrity assessment, and if required, repair and rehabilitation measures.

What’s in your storage cavern?

It’s that time of the year when the natural gas industry takes stock of its supplies that it attempts to match with consumption and demand. Thanks to burgeoning production from the Marcellus Shale, consumers have had little problem accessing natural gas despite two colder than normal winters.

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota's taxable sales and purchases dropped more than 16% during April, May and June compared to the same quarter a year ago because of a decline in activity in the western oil patch.

It is only the second such quarterly decline since 2009, but officials say they're not surprised nor too concerned given the tremendous growth in taxable sales and purchases the state has experienced in recent years.

In December 2014, the industrial control system (ICS) security community learned of the latest serious attack against a control system. The attack targeted a German steel mill, which reported massive damage to a blast furnace as a result. The attack was a classic persistent targeted attack (PTA): a spear-phishing attack gained a foothold on the corporate network, which enabled the attackers to work their way into the control system network by remote control.

Work has begun on the Polarled project – the first pipeline crossing the Arctic Circle – for a consortium of Statoil-led companies. The 482-km, 36-inch pipeline will run from Nyhamna in western Norway to the Aasta Hansteen field, creating a new "gas highway" from the Norwegian Sea to Europe.

The world’s largest pipelaying vessel, Solitaire from Allseas, is carrying out the job, In July, Pipelines International reported work was advancing with crews working around the clock.

Phillips 66 and Spectra Energy, 50/50 joint venture owners in DCP Midstream, LLC, have entered into a nonbinding letter of intent for contributing assets to strengthen DCP Midstream. This transaction is expected to provide DCP Midstream with a stronger balance sheet and increased financial flexibility, and positions DCP to grow through commodity price cycles.

The Interstate Natural Gas Association of America (INGAA) contends that the methane and volatile organic chemical (VOC) emission limits for transmission pipelines proposed by the EPA will in many instances be difficult to comply with.

Don Santa, president and CEO of INGAA, said, "While we haven’t had a chance to review fully the 500-plus page proposal, INGAA is concerned that some aspects of the EPA’s methane proposal would be impossible to implement cost-effectively, and that the regulations, if implemented, could adversely affect the reliability of interstate natural gas pipelines."

Syndicate content